8 Responses

  1. Paul Bryson says:

    I think the information is well informed and pretty well covers what most modellers need to know about thinning I have used IPA with Tamiya with no terrible contrra outcomes thought it really is down to price I also use enamel paint as you say better to use the brand thiner for them though the lack of modellers shops has had me using turpentine work but moderate use is advisable but a well informed piece regards Paul a modeller

  2. Gesshoku says:

    Hey. I think it would be good to add gaia colors and see if the companies that made these paints made new dedicated paints toward model kits.

    • Blaze says:

      Hey, sorry for being late with comment approval, I’ve been on break from running the site for the past month.

      Thanks for the suggestion, I’ve added Gaia and SMS to the lacquer brands. At the end of day these are just examples though, there are dozens of various local brands, available only in certain parts of the world. They’re all quality products, though it’d be hard to list all of them and keep it up to date, so I figured it’s best to focus on the most popular and commonly available ones.

      • DanteAxe_SW says:

        No problem and thank you very much. I’m REALLY glad you made this, I’ve been sharing it in every modeling forum, FB, discords and some occasional board threads for the past months, everybody loved this guide as it helped them much.

  3. Robb Merrill says:

    As a note, the fumes from solvent based enamels is actually worse for you in the long term than lacquers. Lacquer thinner, largely made of acetone, will make you dizzy faster but it also expelled from the body easier and breaks down into water vapor. Solvent based enamels use mineral distillates and/or petroleum distillates which can reside in the fatty tissues for years. They also tend to break down into ozone depleting dioxides when curing. Both should be handled with a lot of caution, unless of course you’re Linc in which case, paint on.

    • Blaze says:

      Interesting, thanks for the insight.
      How about odorless turpentine and other odorless thinners? Aside from having no smell, are they actually safer to use than standard ones?

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